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Global Learning Outcomes

Upon completing a globalized course at Harper College, a student shall be able to:


1. Evaluate issues of social justice and sustainable development.

Examples of course-specific outcomes that would meet this requirement include:
  • Identify ethical, political, economic, social and/or environmental global challenges.
  • Demonstrate the skills to take informed and responsible action to address ethical, social, and environmental challenges in global systems.
  • Evaluate the local and broader consequences of individual and collective interventions.

2. Recognize the interdependence and interconnectedness of world systems.

Examples of course-specific outcomes that would meet this requirement include:
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the connection between countries and peoples of the world and recognize the political, economic, and environmental interdependence between them.
  • Demonstrate the ability to interpret issues from more than one cultural perspective.

3. Demonstrate competence in intercultural communication.

Examples of course-specific outcomes that would meet this requirement include:
  • Recognize individual and cultural differences and demonstrate an ability to communicate and interact effectively and respectfully across cultures.
  • Identify and critique instances of cultural stereotyping and show empathy and respect for differences in culture, worldviews, and viewpoints
  • Demonstrate effort to acquire knowledge of at least one language other than one’s own native language.

4. Demonstrate skills of critical analysis in cross-cultural comparisons.

Examples of course-specific outcomes that would meet this requirement include:
  • Critically compare beliefs, values and assumptions between and among groups with respect to race, gender, sexual identity, nation faith, and economic circumstances.
  • Analyze media to discern various perspectives, interests and biases and their effects in forming, shaping, and manipulating worldviews.

5. Articulate an understanding of global perspectives.

Examples of course-specific outcomes that would meet this requirement include:
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the historical, political, religious and economic forces that have shaped the current world system (including global power dynamics, inter-nation conflicts, imperialism, post-colonialism).
  • Demonstrate knowledge of world geography.

 

Levels of Integration


Since the goal of any learning outcome is to offer an instructor a means to assess the effectiveness of student learning, it needs not only to reflect the curriculum but also to inspire the curriculum and inform our teaching. There are three levels of integration of global content.

Introduced
At the “Introduced” level, faculty present basic information about global concepts, show maps and/or images from abroad to students, ask them about their awareness of global concepts. At this level, assessment of GLOs is minimal.

Reinforced
If the global content is “Reinforced,” students explore global concepts through directed activities, reading assignments, guided essays, class discussions and projects. At this level, assessment may be in the form of exam questions, homework assignments and essays, and/or group projects.

Integrated
In a fully “Integrated” course, a significant portion of class is devoted to global concepts. Students may complete entire units that focus on a global concept, issue, country, or region. GLOs are assessed using exams, research papers, student presentations, and/or student projects.